resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
The fare is cheap and all can go.
The rich and poor are there.
No second class aboard this train,
No difference in the fare.
Get on board, chirren,
Get on board, chirren,
Get on board, chirren,
Where there's room for many a more.


I was just listening to the Fisk Jubilee Chorus and it occurred to me that all those gospel and country-gospel songs about trains were probably written when trains were new.

Think how cheesy it would be right now to write a gospel song about how we could all use our iPhones to find Jesus on the internet.

Just goes to show, (a) time converts some cheese to gold, or else (b) the gospel writers of the past were just fundamentally better than we are.
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
Y'all, you have to see this.

A while back, [personal profile] constance offered to do fictional architecture drawings. (I love fandom; where else do you get fictional architectural drawings?) I asked her for Pooh and Piglet's house.

For those of you who don't spend a lot of time reading children's books, toward the end of the Pooh stories, Owl's house has been blown down by a storm, and Owl, for reasons that don't need exploring at this juncture, has laid claim to Piglet's house. Christopher Robin says to Piglet, "What would you do if your house were blown down by a storm?" and Pooh answers: "He would come and live with me."

If you go here, to Constance's fanarchitecture site, you can see the entirely adorable house they live in.

I am so charmed by this I can't even say. Don't forget to click on "Notes" on the upper right for some of her thoughts on design.
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
I don't even believe in astrology, but I consider Rob Breszny of Free Will Astrology to be something close to a poet, so I'm signed up for his weekly e-mails. This is how this week's e-mail began.


Do you promise to push hard to get better and smarter, grow your devotion to the truth, fuel your commitment to beauty, refine your emotions, hone your dreams, wrestle with your shadow, purge your ignorance, and soften your heart -- even as you always accept yourself for exactly who you are, with all of your so-called foibles and wobbles?

Do you pledge to wake yourself up, never hold back, have nothing to lose, go all the way, kiss the stormy sky, be the hero of your own story, ask for everything you need and give everything you have, take yourself to the river when it's time to go to the river, and take yourself to the mountaintop when it's time to go to the mountaintop?
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
Wow, that was a long time to go without a computer. My laptop has a new logicboard, and they've added some stiffening to the keyboard half, so it feels subtly different. If I ever had my doubts about whether AppleCare was worth the money, I am now convinced.

I'm so very happy to be in touch with my imaginary friends again!

This period of computerlessness convinced me of some unsettling things about the computer, though:

Read more... )
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
Well, why not? I've started a CafePress shop with "can't sleep. fangirls will slash me." on T-shirts, boxers, etc.

I made an image for "fanboys will slash me," but because it's a free shop, if I have a white tee with the fangirls design, I can't also have a white tee with a fanboys design. But what do I want for free, I ask you.

I propose

Mar. 3rd, 2008 08:18 pm
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Head exploded)
that somebody should totally make a men's T-shirt that says, "Can't Sleep. Fangirls Will Slash Me."

Edited to add: OK, maybe that somebody could be me.
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
"The text is immutable, and the opinions are often only an expression of despair over it."

Franz Kafka, "The Trial"
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Blair glasses)
"Astrologer Caroline Casey offers an apt metaphor to illustrate how crucial it is for us to hear and read good stories. She notes that if we don't have enough of the normal, healthy kind of iodine in our bodies, we absorb radioactive iodine, which has entered the food chain through nuclear test explosions conducted in the atmosphere. Similarly, unless we fill ourselves up with stories that invigorate us, we're more susceptible to sopping up the poisonous, degenerative narratives."

(from Free Will Astrology.)

Voices

Aug. 10th, 2005 05:27 pm
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
Not long ago, the spouse got a job offer. After much deliberation, he decided it wouldn't suit him as well as his current job. But he was haunted by the voice of his father in his head, saying, "You're out of your mind not to take it. It must be because you're scared."

(His actual father, when consulted, said, "There's no sense in taking a job if you're not going to enjoy it.")

I told this to the Tech Goddess. She said, "The voice in my head is my mother, saying, 'No matter how good you are, they can always find someone who's better.' "

I myself have been working for eleven years to silence the voice of my mother in my head, critiquing every damned bite I eat. "You don't need that. You don't need that. Look at you. You don't need that." I was very angry at her for a long time, and then I realized that same voice must be droning on relentlessly in her head, too.

What do the voices in your head say? And have you had any luck in making them shut up?
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Cupcake)
Me: Here's a spam subject line. 'Buy all your prescription needs here.'

Spouse: So what?

Me: Well, I don't need to buy any needs. I've got enough needs as it is.

Spouse: That's not a bad description of commercial culture, actually. You buy needs. It's like drinking salt water.
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
Me: "Damn, damn, damn!"

Spouse: "What?"

Me: "I just spilled nail polish all over my jeans. And my hands. And my feet."

Spouse: "That's too bad. And I'll bet you didn't even get to taste any of it."
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Harry eyes)
This is from G.K. Chesterton, and for some reason it makes me think of James Potter and his friends:

"The more sincere and passionate and even headstrong a lad is the more certain he is to be conventional. The bolder and freer he seems the more the traditions of the college or the rules of the club will hold him with their gyves of gossamer; and the less afraid he is of his enemies, the more cravenly he will be afraid of his friends."

Overheard

Nov. 2nd, 2004 10:42 pm
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
The guy on television says, "Karl Rove has been talking for four years about these four million missing evangelicals."

The spouse says, "Hey, the Rapture must have already happened!"
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
I took the kidlet to our pathetic little excuse for a zoo yesterday, and naturally I began thinking about psychology in the monkey house.

The monkey house is unnerving. The monkeys make eye contact. Some of them seem to be under a misapprehension as to who is on display for the entertainment of whom.

In one cage, there was a monkey stretched out at its ease. Next to it sat a second monkey, carefully grooming it and eating the bugs. (The expression on the face of Grooming Monkey was familiar; it was the expression you see on a woman who's cooking and carrying on a conversation at the same time.)

Then a third monkey reached across Grooming Monkey and picked a bug off of Top Monkey. Top Monkey took no notice, but Grooming Monkey screeched and gave Wannabe Monkey a big smack upside the head.

My first thought -- well, OK, my first thought was, Hel-lo, fandom. But my second thought was: This is why ambition has never much appealed to me.

You might eventually get to be Top Monkey, but the odds are against you. And in the meantime, not only are you picking the bugs off of Top Monkey, but you're actually fighting other monkeys for the privilege.

Corsets

Jun. 3rd, 2004 02:52 pm
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
I went to my first Romance Writers of America meeting last night. The program was given by a professor of costume design (and an expert in historical clothing), who brought in a colleague dressed in 19th-century underwear and proceeded to dress her up in a typical outfit for an upper-class Englishwoman of the time.

The skirt weighed thirty pounds. It was like holding one of those lead aprons they use when they x-ray your teeth.

As a concession to the health of the model, the corset gave her a 27-inch waist, rather than the more historically accurate measurement of 13 to 16 inches.

Which leads me to the Cool Fact of the Day: Apparently, in those days, the experts believed that if you laced a woman tightly enough into a corset, she would be incapable of feeling sexual desire. (They considered this a good thing.)

Hence the term "straitlaced."

("Strait," of course, means "tight," and now none of you will ever spell the word "straightlaced" again, right?)

They might not have been entirely wrong about that, actually. If a woman, even quite a thin one, was laced down to a 13-inch waist, then anything that made her breathe fast would quickly cause unconsciousness.

Corsets, in one form or another, were common right into the twentieth century, guys, and came back again in the 1950s. We had a narrow escape.
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
"if I was fairly happy with what I'd done, then listening to someone who disliked it for reasons that had nothing to do with what I was trying to do and whether I actually got there or not was a deeply silly thing to do, as was deciding, because two people didn't like it, to shelve the story for ever."

-- Neil Gaiman

"The world is always trying to narrate itself. That's fine. I just wish it would stop trying to title itself."

-- [livejournal.com profile] irongall
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
I was fed up with books, which I still continued to gulp down with indiscriminate voracity, and searched for another key to the highest truths: there must be a key, and I was certain that, owing to some monstrous conspiracy to my detriment and the world's, I would not get it in school. In school they loaded me with tons of notions which I diligently digested, but which did not warm the blood in my veins. I would watch the buds swell in spring, the mica glint in the granite, my own hands, and I would say to myself: "I will understand this, too, I will understand everything, but not the way they want me to. I will find a shortcut, I will make a lock-pick, I will push open the doors."


Ambitious; intelligent but not quite scholarly; arrogant ... Marauder-era Snape?

(The quote is from "Hydrogen," a chapter of Primo Levi's The Periodic Table, which is a perfectly astonishing book.)
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
"Like all net and lattice designers [...] Nathan is superstitious about his creations. He wonders sometimes, if by some chance there is a heaven, whether all its gates will be barred to him ... For his hubris."

-- Greg Bear, Slant

I put this up because I wondered if it was true. Programmers? Ring true to you?

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